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  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/benbruscella/www.messdev.org/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/benbruscella/www.messdev.org/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/benbruscella/www.messdev.org/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/benbruscella/www.messdev.org/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
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  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/benbruscella/www.messdev.org/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.

Crockett’s Theme

MESS’s Apple II emulation gets another “world’s first” notch with incoming support for the Mountain Computer Music System (MCMS for short). The MCMS was designed in 1979 and consisted of two boards that had to go in adjacent slots with a ribbon cable between them. It provided 16 8-bit wavetable voices, with 8 permanently assigned to each of the two stereo channels. The wavetables consisted of 256 bytes of 8-bit samples, and were DMAed from the Apple II’s memory.

Thanks, Egan!

Apple /// user Egan Ford has done some additional testing on the driver and even posted a nice harddisk image to reproduce his results. So here’s some more things the Apple /// driver can do. (At the request of Tony Diaz, I’m posting aspect-corrected screenshots here to better represent how the emulation actually looks).
AppleWriter ///

Advanced VisiCalc

A few technical notes on the Apple ///

For my own benefit as much as anyone’s, here’s how Apple /// extended addressing works. (This doesn’t need to be linked at MW; there’s no end-user value here unless you are an end user who plans to write new software for the Apple ///).

A few technical notes on the Apple ///

For my own benefit as much as anyone’s, here’s how Apple /// extended addressing works. (This doesn’t need to be linked at MW; there’s no end-user value here unless you are an end user who plans to write new software for the Apple ///).

Sara redux

When last we left the Apple /// emulation, we had world’s-first app compatibility but general unease over seemingly random instability in the System Utilities, and the Selector /// installer failed every time. After taking a dive into the schematics, I realized that the instruction modification trick was actually far, far simpler than I’d been giving it credit for (this is a computer released in 1980).

Meet Sara

The Apple /// computer, codenamed “Sara”, has been something of a white whale of emulation for over a decade now. In the late 90s Chris Smolinski of Black Cat Systems started an emulator named Sara. It was originally for 680×0-based Macs running the “classic” MacOS, and later moved targets, first to PowerPC, then to Mac OS X, and finally to Intel Mac OS X.

Meet Sara

The Apple /// computer, codenamed “Sara”, has been something of a white whale of emulation for over a decade now. In the late 90s Chris Smolinski of Black Cat Systems started an emulator named Sara. It was originally for 680×0-based Macs running the “classic” MacOS, and later moved targets, first to PowerPC, then to Mac OS X, and finally to Intel Mac OS X.

Meet Sara

The Apple /// computer, codenamed “Sara”, has been something of a white whale of emulation for over a decade now. In the late 90s Chris Smolinski of Black Cat Systems started an emulator named Sara. It was originally for 680×0-based Macs running the “classic” MacOS, and later moved targets, first to PowerPC, then to Mac OS X, and finally to Intel Mac OS X.

A different kind of tower defense

smf‘s ongoing refactor of the ATA/IDE code finally allowed cleanly adding Phil Bennett‘s long-awaited support for Turret Tower. Here’s a few screens – it plays OK with a Xbox 360 pad to do the analog steering.

Blank and ready

I’ve previously posted pre-formatted Macintosh HDD images; here’s a similar 100 MB .chd for the Apple II series using the CFFA2 card emulation. This image is set up for an enhanced IIe or IIgs with ProDOS 8 2.0.1 and BASIC.SYSTEM and contains 4 partitions (3 at 32 MB, 1 at 4 MB). Assuming the CFFA2 card is in slot 7, the first 2 partitions are slot 7 drives 1 and 2 and the second 2 are slot 4 drives 1 and 2. Use your favorite ProDOS utility to populate the partitions.
The 100 MB image is here.