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Runnin’ some stuff on the Apple /// in MESS

Here’s a very, very long list of things someone tried back in April. Some of the mentioned issues (e.g. ctrl-reset) have been addressed since then, and more machine features and peripherals work now as well.

Humpty Dumpty

We’ve had a dump of likely Kyle Hodgetts game “Eggs Playing Chicken” for a while, but it was just recently brought to my attention. After adding it, we had some issues emulating the Trident SVGA chipset it used, which Barry Rodewald kindly fixed, and that gets us these screens:

I hate meeces to pieces

Guru dumped the 68705 MCU from an Apple II Mouse Card and I did the rest…

Retro-futuristic

Moving on from our last post, here’s one of the alphaSyntauri demo songs. This is quite a bit more ambitious in terms of multitimbrality than the MCMS samples I posted yesterday, and really shows how far ahead of its time the hardware was in 1980.
Skip the video to 1:34 to ignore the bootup sequence and get right to the tunes.

Crockett’s Theme

MESS’s Apple II emulation gets another “world’s first” notch with incoming support for the Mountain Computer Music System (MCMS for short). The MCMS was designed in 1979 and consisted of two boards that had to go in adjacent slots with a ribbon cable between them. It provided 16 8-bit wavetable voices, with 8 permanently assigned to each of the two stereo channels. The wavetables consisted of 256 bytes of 8-bit samples, and were DMAed from the Apple II’s memory.

Thanks, Egan!

Apple /// user Egan Ford has done some additional testing on the driver and even posted a nice harddisk image to reproduce his results. So here’s some more things the Apple /// driver can do. (At the request of Tony Diaz, I’m posting aspect-corrected screenshots here to better represent how the emulation actually looks).
AppleWriter ///

Advanced VisiCalc

A few technical notes on the Apple ///

For my own benefit as much as anyone’s, here’s how Apple /// extended addressing works. (This doesn’t need to be linked at MW; there’s no end-user value here unless you are an end user who plans to write new software for the Apple ///).

A few technical notes on the Apple ///

For my own benefit as much as anyone’s, here’s how Apple /// extended addressing works. (This doesn’t need to be linked at MW; there’s no end-user value here unless you are an end user who plans to write new software for the Apple ///).

Sara redux

When last we left the Apple /// emulation, we had world’s-first app compatibility but general unease over seemingly random instability in the System Utilities, and the Selector /// installer failed every time. After taking a dive into the schematics, I realized that the instruction modification trick was actually far, far simpler than I’d been giving it credit for (this is a computer released in 1980).

Meet Sara

The Apple /// computer, codenamed “Sara”, has been something of a white whale of emulation for over a decade now. In the late 90s Chris Smolinski of Black Cat Systems started an emulator named Sara. It was originally for 680×0-based Macs running the “classic” MacOS, and later moved targets, first to PowerPC, then to Mac OS X, and finally to Intel Mac OS X.